Grace Kingsbury - PhD Student gkingsbury@bournemouth.ac.uk

PhD Title: The Scandinavian Resilience Incongruity: Can Societal Safety and Widespread Resilience Co-Exist in Times of Crisis?

 

Education/Experience:

Grace studied her undergraduate degree at Loughborough University, completing a BA (Hons) History and Politics in 2014. It was during this degree that she found her interest in crises and security, studying a module on National Security and Intelligence.

She went on to study an MRes in International Crisis Management at Loughborough with Professor Lee Miles. She completed the degree in 2015 with the highest distinction in the cohort.

 

Grace works as a Senior Crisis Consultant in the Reputation, Crisis and Resilience team at Deloitte. She and her team help clients to navigate crises and issues by providing expert advice and advisory services at times of high pressure. She has delivered crisis communications programmes, crisis leadership training, designed and developed exercises and simulations, and built resilience and crisis response frameworks for clients. Grace has worked across various sectors, covering anything from financial services to life sciences and beyond. Her PhD work at BUDMC informs much of the resilience work she does at Deloitte, and, in turn, her experience from the corporate world strengthens her research efforts.

 

Research Interests:

Grace’s research interests are impacted by the notion of commonly accepted notions and paradigms being contrary to what was assumed. During her undergraduate studies, her dissertation was focused on the paradox of Nazi Germany’s medical experiments looking to strengthen the human race contrasted against the key themes of the Hippocratic Oath. Furthermore, in her MRes research focusing on West Africa, she looked at the humanitarian aid efforts and how they were, in many ways, extremely damaging and reminiscent of the Colonial era.

 

Going forward, she is looking at the assumption of high levels of safety being associated with equally high levels of resilience, using the commonly acknowledged ‘safe’ region of Scandinavia as a case study to explore whether this relationship fully exists.

Scandinavia is an area that Grace is extremely interested in, as the region changes and becomes less homogenous as migration increases. The impact of the region’s history on it’s present day, combined with the rare, but deeply impactful occurrence of crises on the Nordic peoples is an area Grace wishes to progress in with her research.

 

Grace hopes to develop an alternative to the current understanding of the relationship between safety and resilience, and apply it to the way in which disasters and crises are handled in Scandinavia, and other so-called ‘safe’, so-called ‘Western’ regions.